'Send nudes': Facebook builds database to stop revenge porn

Mandy Carr
November 10, 2017

Facebook today explained in more detail its new test for combating revenge porn following mass confusion earlier this week over how exactly the system works and whether it puts users at a higher risk for abuse.

The Australian government's Office of the eSafety Commissioner announced it is one of four countries who is in a pilot program with Facebook that will help prevent intimate images from being posted and shared across Facebook, Messenger, Facebook Groups and Instagram.

People in Australia who are concerned that a former partner may distribute intimate photos of them on Facebook can use Messenger to send the photos to be "hashed", according to the office of Australia's e-safety commissioner. " That way Facebook can identify the photos should someone else try to circulate them through the site".

Prof Clare McGlynn, from Durham Law School, said that the United Kingdom should establish a similar organisation to Australia's e-safety commission. The organization might then tell them to send a nude photo of themselves to themselves via Messenger.

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"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", she said. The same hashing technology has been used for years to prevent the spread of child porn, and is also used by internet companies to share and block terrorist images, reported the Telegraph.

She said the plan, "has the potential to disable the control and power perpetrators hold over victims, particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion, and the subsequent harm that could come to them". The program will be tested in Australia first, followed by the U.S., U.K., and Canada, the Times of London reported.

"To prevent adversarial reporting, at this time we need to have humans review the images in a controlled, secure environment", Stamos further explained on Twitter.

Other reports by Guamnewswatch

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